Harvest Moon Over Bridaveil Falls Yosemite National Park

Harvest Moon Over Bridaveil Falls Yosmite National Park.

Harvest Moon Over Bridaveil Falls Yosmite National Park.  What is a Harvest Moon? In traditional skylore, the Harvest Moon is the full moon closest to the autumnal equinox, and depending on the year, the Harvest Moon can come anywhere from two weeks before to two weeks after the autumnal equinox. For us in the Northern Hemisphere, the 2015 autumnal equinox comes on September 23, so the September 27-28 full moon counts as the Northern Hemisphere’s Harvest Moon.

By the way, this year’s Harvest Moon will present the closest and largest full moon of the year. It’ll also stage a total eclipse of the moon on the night of September 27-28.

However, the Harvest Moon over Bridaveil Falls, Yosemite National Park isn’t always the biggest full moon of the year or more pumpkin-colored than other full moons. It’s special because, at this time of year in the Northern Hemisphere, the time between successive moonrises – from one night to the next – is shorter than usual. But this year, 2015, the Harvest Moon is a bit bigger than usual … because it’s a supermoon.

What makes this moon a supermoon? This year’s Harvest Moon qualifies as a supermoon because the moon turns full about one hour after reaching lunar perigee – the moon’s closest point to Earth for the month. Read more about the 2015 supermoons here.

Here’s what you can notice, if you live on a coastline. Watch for this full moon to bring along wide-ranging spring tides along ocean coastlines for several days following full moon. That is, high tides will climb extra high and the low tides will fall exceptionally low.

Which night is the 2015 Harvest Moon for me since I was in Yosemite? The full Harvest Moon for 2015 falls on September 27 or September 28, depending on your location on the globe. In North America, the crest of the moon’s full phase comes on September 27, at 7:51 p.m. PDT. So the night of September 27 has the brightest, fullest moon for the Americas.

No matter where you are on Earth, a brilliant full-looking moon ascends over your eastern horizon around the time of sunset on September 27. It climbs highest in the sky around the middle of the night, when the sun is below your feet. That’s because the moon lies opposite the sun in our sky at the vicinity of full moon. Being opposite the sun, the moon is showing us its fully lighted hemisphere, or “day” side. That’s what makes the moon look full. http://thruthelensephotography.com/harvest-moon-over-bridalveil-falls-yosemite-national-park/

Order Harvest Moonlight, Yosemite

  • Other sizes are available upon request. Please contact Wendy M. Seagren
  • Each print is hand signed by the artist, Wendy M. Seagren.
  • The temporary rights for usage of a photo is available for purchase. Contact Wendy M. Seagren.

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