Japanese Maple Tree, Portland Japanese Garden, Oregon

Japanese Maple Tree, Portland Japanese Garden, Oregon

Japanese Maple Tree, Portland Japanese Garden, Oregon.  Autumn sets a Japanese maple afire with color. The tree (Acer palmatum) is one species among many at the Portland Japanese Garden in Oregon, a 5.5-acre showplace meant to evoke the gardens of an estate in pre-modern Japan.

The 5.5 acre Portland Japanese Garden is composed of five sub-gardens.  As a Japanese garden, the desired effect is to realize a sense of peace, harmony, and tranquility and to experience the feeling of being a part of nature.  The garden has five major sub-gardens, each a different degree of formality.

The Strolling Pond Garden is the largest and contains multiple areas. In one, rocks built into the path are arranged as the Big Dipper constellation. There is a 100-year-old five-tiered pagoda lantern, a gift from Portland’s sister city of Sapporo with ornamental rocks forming the shape of Hokkaidō island and a red stone for Sapporo. Several ornate or whimsical bridges cross the creeks between ponds. There is also a handmade moon bridge.

The Natural Garden has multiple ponds, waterfalls, and streams. Trees, shrubs, ferns, and mosses grow in their natural state.
The Sand and Stone Garden contains weathered stones rising from rippled sand suggestive of the ocean. The tranquil rake patterns are often present in karesansui (Japanese rock gardens).

The Flat Garden is typical of urban garden design, but here it contrasts with the park’s folds and contours. Raked white sand represents water and vividly contrasts with lawn, moss, evergreens, and azaleas.

The Tea Garden has two areas, each devoted to enhancing the tea ceremony: an outer waiting area and an inner garden surrounding the authentic tea house, constructed in Japan by Kajima Construction Company and assembled onsite in 1968.
Three of the essential elements used to create the garden are stone, the “bones” of the landscape; water, the life-giving force; and plants, the tapestry of the four seasons. Japanese garden designers feel that good stone composition is one of the most important elements in creating a well-designed garden. Secondary elements include pagodas, stone lanterns, water basins, arbors, and bridges. Japanese gardens are asymmetrical in design and reflect nature in idealized form. Traditionally, human scale is maintained throughout so that one always feels part of the environment and not overpowered by it.

The Garden Pavilion was built in 1980 in Japanese style by local builders.  It has a tiled roof, wooden verandas, and Shōji sliding doors. It is the center of several Japanese cultural festivals, art exhibitions, and other events.  The west veranda faces the Flat Garden, and the east veranda overlooks downtown Portland and Mount Hood, which resembles Mount Fuji.  Dozens of stone lanterns are present throughout the garden. The lower entrance features a 100-year-old temple gate, a 1976 gift of the Japanese Ancestral Society of Oregon.  For more information follow this link to 

Order Japanese Maple Tree, Portland Japanese Garden, Oregon

  • Other sizes are available upon request. Please contact Wendy M. Seagren
  • Each print is hand signed by the artist, Wendy M. Seagren.
  • The temporary rights for usage of a photo is available for purchase. Contact Wendy M. Seagren.

BACK TO SHOPPING